Martial Arts to a Brazilian Beat in Colorado Springs
719-635-1004
975 Garden of the Gods Rd #F Colorado Springs, CO 80907

Read what people
just like you are
saying about us!

“We are very pleased with the opportunity that our family has to practice capoeira together. Capoeira for us is more than a martial art or dance class: Capoeira for us is the possibility to spend a quality time together... read more"

-Cai adult student and mother of 14 year old student

“My daughter has been doing capoeira now close to a year. She started right after she turned 5 years old. At that age her attention span was pretty short but she continues to be very interested in continuing capoeira... read more"

-Beth, parent of 6 year old student

Colorado Springs Martial Arts

This page includes some lyrics from some songs commonly heard in the roda. Translations are also included, and as necessary further explanation is given.

Zum, zum, zum,
Capoeira mata um!
Zum, zum, zum,
Capoeira mata um!
Onde tem marimbondo
Tem zum, zum, zum
Onde tem marimbondo
Tem zum, zum, zum
Zum, zum, zum,
Capoeira kills one!
Zum, zum, zum,
Capoeira kills one!
Where there is a wasp
There is a zum, zum, zum
Where there is a wasp
There is a zum, zum, zum
Zum, zum, zum, describes both the sound of the berimbau, and the quick movements of the capoeiristas. The chorus responds "where there is a wasp there is a zum, zum, zum." In English we might say "where there is smoke there is fire!" Watch out, if you can hear the sound of the berimbau there is probably a capoeirista nearby.

Ai, ai, ai, ai doutor
se quiser me chamar eu vou, eu vou!
Ai, ai, ai, ai doutor
Navegando no mar eu vou, eu vou!

Ai, ai, ai, ai doctor
If you want to call me I'll go, I'll go!
Ai, ai, ai, ai doctor
Sailing the sea I'll go, I'll go!

"Doutor" is a term often used in Brazilian Portuguese to imply someone of higher class, means, or education. "Ai" is the word for "ouch," or "yikes!" The song shows the singer's submission (real or intentionally misleading). In capoeira music the movements of the ginga are often compared to sailing the sea, or riding the waves.

Me leva morena me leva,
me leva pra seu bangalo!
me leva morena me leva,
me leva me leva pra seu bangalo!

Me leva morena me leva,
me leva pra seu bangalo!
me leva morena me leva,
que hoje sou pobre amanha sou doutor!

Take me dark skinned girl, take me,
Take me to your bungalow!
Take me dark skinned girl, take me,
Take me to your bungalow!

Take me dark skinned girl, take me,
Take me to your bungalow!
Take me dark skinned girl, take me,
because today I'm poor but tomorrow I'm a doctor!

In many countries outside of Brazil (including the United States) there are almost equal numbers of men and women training capoeira. In Brazil even today the number of men training capoeira far outweighs the number of women training. Part of this is because of the history of capoeira in Brazil. Capoeira still doesn't have much of a history outside of Brazil, but the prohibition and dangerous element so common to its history has helped create a feeling of machismo. What might be considered very sexist sounding lyrics to a foreigner could be a way of representing the beauty of capoeira and the strong desire to play in the roda.

Paranaue, paranaue, parana
Vou me embora enquanto e cedo
que a noite tenho medo!

Parana Paranaue, paranaue, parana
Mulher pra ser bonita, parana
Nao precisa se pintar, parana.

Paranaue, paranaue, parana
A pintura e do artista, parana,
A beleza e Deus que da, parana.

Paranaue, paranaue, parana
I'm leaving while it's early
because at night I'm afraid!

Parana Paranaue, paranaue, parana
for a woman to be beautiful, parana
she doesn't need to paint herself, parana.

Paranaue, paranaue, parana
A painting is by an artist, parana,
Beauty is given by God, parana.

Parana is the name of a state in Brazil. It has come to represent freedom and is used symbolically in many capoeira songs. Aruande and Luanda (the capital of Angola) are often used similarly representing freedom, or even heaven, and often carry a feeling of nostalgia. Of course this would be a common theme among slaves singing of desired freedoms. What types of freedom might modern capoeiristas be seeking?

Vinha da Bahia pra lhe ver.
Vinha da Bahia pra lhe ver.
Vinha da Bahia pra lhe ver,
pra lhe ver, pra lhe ver, pra lhe ver, pra lhe ver, pra lhe ver.

Jangava la do Rio de Janeiro,
da Bahia que e terra de muita fe.
Minha mae e uma grande lavadeira,
e meu pai usa peneira na colheita do cafe.

I came from Bahia to see you.
I came from Bahia to see you.
I came from Bahia to see you.
to see you, to see you, to see you, to see you, to see you.

I sailed to Rio de Janeiro,
From Bahia the land of much faith.
My mother is a great washerwoman,
and my father uses a seive in the coffee harvest.

A jangada is a small raft with a sail. It is especially common in the northeast of Brazil. It is not uncommon for poor fisherman to spend days at a time fishing on high seas in these small craft. The chorus of this song implies the pride the singer has though coming from humble means.

Tem dende, tem dende,
Na Bahia tem dende!

Tem dende, tem dende,
Capoeira tem dende!

Tem dende, tem dende,
Mestre Bimba tem dende!

There is dende, there is dende,
In Bahia there is dende!

There is dende, there is dende,
Capoeira has dende!

There is dende, there is dende,
Mestre Bimba has dende!

Dende is a palm kernel oil used in many traditional recipes in northeastern Brazil, especially in Bahia where the African influence is the greatest. It's distinctive rich flavor and smooth slippery consistency serve as symbols in many capoeira songs. When we say something or someone has "dende" it means they have the "stuff," or what it takes to be good at capoeira.

Naco naco, chico chico, mela mela
eu andei foi na capela,
vi um padre no altar.
Eu dei um pulo, dei dois pulo, dei tres pulo,
acabei pulando o muro
nunca paro de pular.

Olha Camunjere como 'ta como 'ta?
Camunjere
Como vai voismice?
Camunjere
Esta bem de saude?
Camunjere
Como vai voismice?

Naco naco, chico chico, mela mela
I walked to the chapel,
I saw the father at the alter.
I jumped once, I jumped twice, I jumped three times,
I ended up jumping the wall
and never stop jumping.

Hey Camunjere how are you?
Camunjere
How are you doing?
Camunjere
Are you feeling well?
Camunjere
How are you?

This nonsensical version of this song reminds us that capoeira is supposed to be fun. Sometimes we do what we do in capoeira because it feels good. Teasing and playfulness are important aspects in the art. The fast difficult intro to the solo is a common demonstration of musical prowess.

Nao me chame de moleque!
Nao me chame de moleque o iaia,
Que moleque nao sou eu.
Quem me chamou de moleque
foi Mestre Besouro e ele morreu.

E tu que e moleque
Moleque e tu!
E tu que e moleque
Moleque e tu!
Nao me chame de moleque
Moleque e tu!
Don't call me a moleque!
Don't call me a moleque!
Because I'm not a moleque.
The last one to call me moleque
was Mestre Besouro and he died.

You are the moleque
You are a moleque!
You are the moleque
You are a moleque!
Don't call me moleque
You are a moleque!
"Moleque" is a slang term that means "street urchin" or "punk." Calling a capoeirista a moleque would for sure be an attack on manliness. This song warns that calling the singer a moleque is a bad idea. The last person to use the insult was Mestre Besouro a legendary capoeira master. The story states that Besouro had achieved an enchanted state known as "corpo fechado" or "closed body" and no person or weapon could effectively cause him any harm. He was killed only after a jealous boss ordered the fabrication of an equally enchanted knife called "faca de tucum." If Besouro was a great mestre with near magical abilities and his weakness was found, what do you suppose would happen to you for calling me a moleque?!?

Martial Arts to a Brazilian Beat in Colorado Springs
Intro Program includes a private martial arts lesson.